Solar speculator halted in bid to bulldoze environment for Obama cash

In the latest act of green-on-green violence, a federal judge has halted construction on a massive solar plant that would have required the bulldozing of 6,000 acres of environmentally sensitive desert and prehistoric Indian sites.

“Local and statewide activists battling massive energy projects on public lands are praising a decision issued by U.S. District Court Judge Larry Burns yesterday, while the CEO of Tessera Solar says he is ‘deeply disappointed’ in the ruling,” Miriam Raftery of East County Magazine reports.

“The federal Judge issued a temporary restraining order halting construction on the first massive desert solar project authorized on public lands—a project that if built, would be one of the largest solar power plants in the world.

“The Court ruled that the U.S. Bureau of Land Management failed to adequately consult with the tribe regarding protection of 459 cultural resources identified at 300 locations on the site in Imperial County. Burns noted that the BLM’s draft environmental impact statement found that the project ‘may wholly or partially destroy all archaeological sites on the surface of the project area.’

“The 10-mile-long project would entail scraping 6,000 acres of the desert floor and installing massive parabolic mirrored Sun Catchers made by Stirling Energy Systems. The project could produce 1,000 MW of power by 2012 and is slated to provide power to be transmitted over SDG&E’s Sunrise Powerlink lines through San Diego’s East County.”

East County reports Tessera Solar, which survives thanks to government handouts because its product cannot compete in a fair market, is pressing to rush the environmentally devastating program in order to qualify for Obama stimulus funds.

Bulldozing the heritage of Native Americans and destroying the environment to make unearned cash?  Yes, that’s the green agenda.

You can read more about this fight between greens and Native Americans, and the split in the “green” community, at http://www.eastcountymagazine.org/node/5023.